Wall Pieces by Johan Deckmann

Wall Pieces by Johan Deckmann

Recognizing the power of language in both therapy and art, Deckmann successfully forms simple phrases that compress information, feelings or fantasies into an essence, and a truth that has an effect that is very similar to therapy. “The right words can be like good medicine,” Deckmann shares. While most of his book titles skirt between hilarious and poignant, underscored by their faded color and worn texture of 1970s era self-help guides, the readers are taken through a journey of self-reflection and soul-searching as they scroll through the entirety of Deckmann’s work. The artist explains that his psychological practice has great influence on his art, not only by serving as a tremendous inspiration for the content of his works, but also as a constant reminder of personal responsibility. “I meet many people who suffer from a circumstance that they themselves have created but they choose not to take action,” he explains. “I think it’s tragicomic that underneath our frustration and self-slavery lies this beautiful opportunity.”

One of the most powerful aspects of Deckmann’s works is that every reader can relate to at least one them on a highly personal level, regardless of what cultural background, gender or age group. Titles such as “How to disappoint and just keep disappointing – Disappointment made easy” can resonate with anyone, but instead of remaining sinister, the work is made humorous by using the same language that you might find on a cook book or instruction kit. “How to burn out instead of fade away” might be most fitting for people that live in big cities under pressure, and, perhaps: “How to keep doing the same old mistakes and expect a different result” could be considered the most universally human of all one-liners.

 

There are some books the viewer might be truly tempted to open, but the artist glues all of them together before painting them with phrases and sometimes silhouetted pictures to accompany them – It is therefore completely up to the viewers to imagine their content.
Some titles serve as a beautiful visualization of unobtainable wishes, such as a book titled “All the dreams that you forgot,” sparking a number of ideas and inspirations within each individual viewer that are much more valuable than any content these books could contain.

Wrong Turn by Johan Deckmann

Wrong Turn by Johan Deckmann

 

 

Artwork

The Idea of Falling in Love by Johan Deckmann
The Idea of Falling in Love by Johan Deckmann
The Idea of Falling in Love by Johan Deckmann
The Two of Us Together by Johan Deckmann
The Two of Us Together by Johan Deckmann
The Two of Us Together by Johan Deckmann
Sane by Johan Deckmann
Sane by Johan Deckmann
Sane by Johan Deckmann
Procrastination by Johan Deckmann
Procrastination by Johan Deckmann
Procrastination by Johan Deckmann
I'm Ok by Johan Deckmann
I’m Ok by Johan Deckmann
I’m Ok by Johan Deckmann
Not Sorry Enough by Johan Deckmann
Not Sorry Enough by Johan Deckmann
Not Sorry Enough by Johan Deckmann
Criticize Everybody Else by Johan Deckmann
Criticize Everybody Else by Johan Deckmann
Criticize Everybody Else by Johan Deckmann
Artlover by Johan Deckmann
Artlover by Johan Deckmann
Artlover by Johan Deckmann
Jealous by Johan Deckmann
Jealous by Johan Deckmann
Jealous by Johan Deckmann
The Same Old Problems by Johan Deckmann
The Same Old Problems by Johan Deckmann
The Same Old Problems by Johan Deckmann
Wrong Turn by Johan Deckmann
Wrong Turn by Johan Deckmann
Wrong Turn by Johan Deckmann
Work Hard by Johan Deckmann
Work Hard by Johan Deckmann
Work Hard by Johan Deckmann