Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup Cans

Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup Cans

“I used to drink it. I used to have the same lunch every day, for twenty years, I guess, the same thing over and over again.”

Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup Cans are credited as the artists signature portfolio and a key transitional work from his hand-painted to photo-transferred paintings. The paintings were first exhibited in 1962 at Ferus Gallery in Los Angels after Irving Blum visited Warhol mid production and immediately invited him to exit the series.

The show art Ferus Gallery was not only Warhol‘s first solo exhibition off pop paintings but also one of the first times Pop art has been exhibited on the West coast. Initially the show received mixed reviews with many intrigued by their novelty but indifferent about their reception as fine art. However, after Blum soon realized the full potential of keep the painting as an entire set bought all 32 canvases.

Six years later, in 1968 Warhol returned to the Campbell Soup Can and reproduced the portfolio in an edition series of screen prints. Each measuring 35 x 23 inches, these prints allowed the iconic image to once again be collected by art lovers.

Warhol’s Soup Cans series I and II demonstrates that artists fascination with the photo-silkscreen printing process, a technique that became as signet of the artist until brand. The ability to create uniformity amongst each flavor allowed Warhol to subvert the idea of paintings as a method of invention and originality.

Throughout his career, Warhol continued to work with the Campbell Soup Cans altering and contorting them. However these original silkscreen remain the most popular and sort after by collectors and even Warhol himself claim the original paintings of the cans were his favorite work.

Guy Hepner is pleased to offer works from Andy Warhol’s Soup Cans series I and II for sale. Please contact the gallery via phone or email.

Niclas Castello Signature